Learning Log: Idealism in Classical Greek Art

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These are my professor’s instructions and I will attach the documents needed: “It is safe to associate art during the Classical period in Ancient Greece with the term “idealism.”   Plato believed that it was impossible for artists to recreate ideal beauty, but he did believe that beauty was manifest on earth.  What are some of the concepts he uses to explain perfection? How does this relate to sculptures such as the work of Polykleitos (hint: Stokstad has a subheading on the Canon of Polykleitos)?  Read the blog post from the British Museum.  According to the author, what is the cultural significance of nudity (particularly male nudity) in Ancient Greece?  Finally, using the example of the Riace Warrior from your textbook (figure 5-30), describe some features of the sculpture that are “idealized” and some that are “naturalistic”.  For full credit, use the term contrapposto!!” Please read the following:https://blog.britishmuseum.org/the-shock-of-the-nude/  – Please read the following: READING: Plato, Polykleitos and Proportion (watch lecture first) Plato, Timaeus  And he began the division in this way. (a) First, he took one  portion from the whole, and next a portion double this; the third half as much again as the second, and three times the first; the fourth double the second; the fifth three times the third; the sixth eight times the first; and the seventh twenty-seven times the first. (b) Next he went on to fill up both the double and triple intervals, cutting off yet more parts from the original mixture and placing them between the terms, so that within each interval there were two means, (b1) the one exceeding and being exceeded by the extremes by the same part, (b2) the other exceeding and being exceeded by  an equal number. These links gave rise to intervals of three to two and four to three and nine to eight within the original intervals. (c) And he went on to fill up all the intervals of four to three with the interval of nine to eight, leaving a part over in each of them. This leftover interval of the part had the ratio of the number two hundred and fifty six to the number two hundred and forty three.   Plato,  Timaeus The god invented and gave us vision in order that we might observe the circuits of mind in the heaven and profit by them for the revolution of our own thought, which are of the same kind as them, though ours be troubled and they are unperturbed; and that by learning to know them and acquiring the  power to compute them rightly according to nature, we might reproduce the perfectly unerring revolutions of the god and reduce to settled order the wandering motions in ourselves.   Plato, Gorgias He should not allow his appetites to be undisciplined or undertake to fill them up. Such a man, Callicles, could not be loved by another nor by a god, for he cannot participate in a community and without community there is no love. Wise men say, my friend, that community and love and order and moderation and justice hold together heaven and earth, gods and men, and that is why they call this universe a cosmos not a chaos or licentious revel. It seems to me that you do not put your mind to these things, even though you are versed in them; rather, failing to observe the great power of geometric equality among gods and among men, you think you should seek for more and more, because you neglect geometry.   Galen, (ca. 200 CE) Chrysippos holds beauty to consist not in the commensurability or “symmetria” of the constituent elements of the body, but in the commensurability of the parts, such as that of finger to finger, and of all the fingers to the palm and wrist, and of those to the forearm, and of the forearm to the upper arm, and in fact, of everything to everything else, just as it is written in the Canon of Polykleitos. For having taught us in that work all the proportions of the body, Polykleitos supported his treatise with a work: he made a statue according to the tenets of his treatise, and called the statue, like the work, the ‘Canon’. tt Pl

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Description

These are my professor’s instructions and I will attach the documents needed: “It is safe to associate art during the Classical period in Ancient Greece with the term “idealism.”   Plato believed that it was impossible for artists to recreate ideal beauty, but he did believe that beauty was manifest on earth.  What are some of the concepts he uses to explain perfection? How does this relate to sculptures such as the work of Polykleitos (hint: Stokstad has a subheading on the Canon of Polykleitos)?  Read the blog post from the British Museum.  According to the author, what is the cultural significance of nudity (particularly male nudity) in Ancient Greece?  Finally, using the example of the Riace Warrior from your textbook (figure 5-30), describe some features of the sculpture that are “idealized” and some that are “naturalistic”.  For full credit, use the term contrapposto!!” Please read the following:https://blog.britishmuseum.org/the-shock-of-the-nude/  – Please read the following: READING: Plato, Polykleitos and Proportion (watch lecture first) Plato, Timaeus  And he began the division in this way. (a) First, he took one  portion from the whole, and next a portion double this; the third half as much again as the second, and three times the first; the fourth double the second; the fifth three times the third; the sixth eight times the first; and the seventh twenty-seven times the first. (b) Next he went on to fill up both the double and triple intervals, cutting off yet more parts from the original mixture and placing them between the terms, so that within each interval there were two means, (b1) the one exceeding and being exceeded by the extremes by the same part, (b2) the other exceeding and being exceeded by  an equal number. These links gave rise to intervals of three to two and four to three and nine to eight within the original intervals. (c) And he went on to fill up all the intervals of four to three with the interval of nine to eight, leaving a part over in each of them. This leftover interval of the part had the ratio of the number two hundred and fifty six to the number two hundred and forty three.   Plato,  Timaeus The god invented and gave us vision in order that we might observe the circuits of mind in the heaven and profit by them for the revolution of our own thought, which are of the same kind as them, though ours be troubled and they are unperturbed; and that by learning to know them and acquiring the  power to compute them rightly according to nature, we might reproduce the perfectly unerring revolutions of the god and reduce to settled order the wandering motions in ourselves.   Plato, Gorgias He should not allow his appetites to be undisciplined or undertake to fill them up. Such a man, Callicles, could not be loved by another nor by a god, for he cannot participate in a community and without community there is no love. Wise men say, my friend, that community and love and order and moderation and justice hold together heaven and earth, gods and men, and that is why they call this universe a cosmos not a chaos or licentious revel. It seems to me that you do not put your mind to these things, even though you are versed in them; rather, failing to observe the great power of geometric equality among gods and among men, you think you should seek for more and more, because you neglect geometry.   Galen, (ca. 200 CE) Chrysippos holds beauty to consist not in the commensurability or “symmetria” of the constituent elements of the body, but in the commensurability of the parts, such as that of finger to finger, and of all the fingers to the palm and wrist, and of those to the forearm, and of the forearm to the upper arm, and in fact, of everything to everything else, just as it is written in the Canon of Polykleitos. For having taught us in that work all the proportions of the body, Polykleitos supported his treatise with a work: he made a statue according to the tenets of his treatise, and called the statue, like the work, the ‘Canon’. tt Pl

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