BRAND MANAGEMENT POSITIONING & VALUES Of IKEA ASSIGNMENT HELP On the PPT chapter3 , please see the brand pyramid model for the POPs and PODs – performance

BRAND MANAGEMENT POSITIONING & VALUES Of IKEA ASSIGNMENT HELP On the PPT chapter3 , please see the brand pyramid model for the POPs and PODs – performance and imagery associations. And answer the following question?APA styles, 2-3pages?: a.Who is the target market for Audi– include demographics, lifestyle, and motives (what benefits and results are they looking for? How does the brand line relate to their lifestyle?). b.Based on the target description motives (benefits sought), What is the competitive frame-of-reference? In other words, what other brands or choices might provide the same benefits? List and explain. c. What are Audis ‘category points-of-parity’ (what do they need to offer that every brand must offer to this target segment?). d.What are their and points-of-difference (what do they do differently than other brands (think about products attributes, user imagery, brand history, values, brand personality, other). CHAPTER: 3
BRAND RESONANCE AND THE
BRAND VALUE CHAIN
Copyright © 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall.
Learning Objectives
?
?
?
?
?
Define brand resonance
Describe the steps in building brand resonance
Define the brand value chain
Identify the stages in the brand value chain
Contrast brand equity and customer equity
Copyright © 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall.
Building A Strong Brand: The Four
Steps of Brand Building
Brand salience
? Brand performance
? Brand imagery
? Brand judgments
? Brand feelings
? Brand resonance
? Brand-building implications
?
Copyright © 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall.
Figure 3.1- Customer-Based Brand
Equity Pyramid
Copyright © 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall.
Figure 3.2 – Subdimensions of Brand
Building Blocks
Copyright © 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall.
Brand Salience
Breadth and Depth of
Awareness
Product Category Structure
Strategic Implications
Copyright © 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall.
Sources of Brand Equity
?
Brand awareness
? Brand
recognition – any association, element
? Brand recall: need/want-category-brand
? Example:
?
Headache, migraine??
Brand image
? Strong,
favorable, and unique brand associations
? Experiences,
other people, company efforts
? True or false (soy milk)
2.7
Copyright © 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall.
Establishing Brand Awareness
?
?
Increasing the familiarity of the brand through
repeated exposure (for brand recognition)
Forging strong associations with the appropriate
product category (positioning) or other relevant
purchase or consumption cues (for brand recall)
? Beer
for special occasions?
? Cancer Treatment?
? Long-Term relationships?
2.8
Copyright © 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall.
Creating a Positive Brand Image
?
Brand Associations
? Does
not matter how build brand association
? Product,
packaging, celebs, co-brands, licenses, distribution,
pricing, event (NASCAR)
? Need
to be favorable, strong, and unique
? Marketers should recognize the influence of these other
sources of information by both managing them as well
as possible and by adequately accounting for them in
designing communication strategies.
2.9
Copyright © 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall.
Brand Performance
?
Describes how well the brand:
? Meets
customers’ more functional needs
? Rate on objective assessments of quality
? Satisfies utilitarian, aesthetic, and economic customer
needs and wants in the product or service category
Copyright © 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall.
Brand Imagery
?
?
?
?
User profile/imagery
Purchase and usage situations/imagery
Brand personality and values
Brand history, heritage, and experiences
Copyright © 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall.
Brand Judgements
?
?
?
?
Quality
Credibility
Consideration
Superiority
Copyright © 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall.
Brand Feelings
?
?
?
Customers’ emotional responses and reactions to the
brand
Relate to the social currency evoked by the brand
Feelings can be:
? Experiential
and immediate, increasing in level of
intensity
? Private and enduring, increasing in level of gravity
Copyright © 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall.
Brand Resonance
?
?
?
?
Behavioral loyalty
Attitudinal attachment
Sense of community
Active engagement
Copyright © 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall.
Brand Building Implications
?
?
?
?
?
Customers own the brand
Don’t take shortcuts with brands
Brands should have a duality
Brands should have richness
Brand resonance provides important focus
Copyright © 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall.
Figure 3.5 – Brand Value Chain
Copyright © 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall.
To Sum up…
?
Implications of brand value chain
?A
necessary condition for value creation is a wellfunded, well-designed, and well-implemented
marketing program
? Value creation requires more than the initial marketing
investment
? Allows to estimate shareholder value and the investor
sentiment multiplier through investor analysis and
interviews
Copyright © 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall.
All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a
retrieval system, or transmitted, in any form or by any means, electronic,
mechanical, photocopying, recording, or otherwise, without the prior written
permission of the publisher. Printed in the United States of America.
Copyright © 2013 Pearson Education, Inc.
Publishing as Prentice Hall
CHAPTER 2:
BRAND POSITIONING & VALUES
Kevin Lane Keller
Tuck School of Business
Dartmouth College
3.1
Brand Positioning
?
Is at the heart of the marketing strategy
?
“. . . the act of designing the company’s offer and image so
that it occupies a distinct and valued place in the target
customer’s minds.”
Philip Kotler
3.2
Brand Positioning Guidelines
? Two
key issues in arriving at the optimal competitive brand
positioning are:
1. Defining and communicating the competitive frame of reference
(new brands) – current brands known!
?
?
?
?
Must identify target market’s wants and nature of competition
Example: Bananas for elderly (competition at benefit level – indirect)
Example: Shave Clubs (new product/service category) – means razors and
membership.
http://www.nesco.com/products/Small-Appliances/Jet-Stream-Ovens/Jet-StreamOven-w-Digital-Timer/
2. Choosing and establishing points-of-parity and points-of-difference
(many expected for category) – Dentist?
? Attributes: taste, variety, texture
? Benefits
vs. low-fat
(social, emotional, experiential, functional) – service
? Value-Expressive
(purchase from small businesses only, support causes)
3.3
How to communicate category
membership
?
Exemplars: – pork, the other “white meat”
– TH mentioned other brands (CK, Polo)
?
Product Descriptor (follows brand name) – Purina Dog Chow
?
Communicate Category Benefits – moist, fluffy, taste for cake
mixes (not muffins).
Determining a frame of reference
Marketers need to know 2 things:
?
?
?
?
Who the target consumer is (wants – benefits, experiences)
Who the main competitors are (provide for wants)
Any level (Gift)
Target: $5 gifts
3.5
Nature of Competition
•
Know target’s wants/motives = categories & subcategories that
threaten
•
Budget, class, category, type, brand
•
Define based on target’s wants/needs:
–
–
–
Ex: Gen X couples spend more on furniture than apparel to align with
lifestyle pursuit
Ex: Soft drink market desires healthier beverages (water)
Family wants to spend less on vacation (restaurants, local
entertainment).
3.6
2. Choosing POP’s & POD’s
? Desirability
?
?
?
criteria (consumer perspective)
Personally relevant – interests, involved
Distinctive and superior – Subaru: all-wheel, passionate
customer, fun, adventure, love the environment
Believable and credible – RunOnFlat tires (GY)
http://www.goodyear.com/en-US/tires/category/run-flat
? Deliverability
?
?
?
criteria (firm perspective)
Feasible – can do it (people, knowledge, partners, assets)
Profitable – sell units, make margins
Pre-emptive, defensible, and difficult to attack
3.7
Attribute and Benefit Trade-offs
?
?
?
?
?
?
?
?
Negatively correlated attributes/benefits (may be within
one attribute: heritage = outdated) – customers want
both!
Price and quality
Convenience and quality
Taste and low calories
Efficacy and mildness
Power and safety
Ubiquity and prestige
Comprehensiveness (variety) and simplicity
3.8
3. Establish POPs & PODs
?
Negative relationships between 2 or more attributes, benefits
?
3 common ways to resolve apparent contradiction:
?
1. separate attributes – run 2 separate campaigns
?
?
2. Leverage equity of other entities (credibility, likability)
?
?
?
?
H & S shampoo – a. dandruff removal & b. beautiful hair campaigns
H & S shampoo – Celebrity for beauty; expert for efficacy
Events/Organizations – sponsor Ms. America Contest; WebMD
endorsement
Brands – Nike Air insole or Cole Haan dress shoes (comfortable dress
shoes)
3. Redefine relationships – both can coexist
?
?
?
Powerful & user friendly (Apple)? – power means ability to use
100k mile warranty?
Quality & low price? IKEA (sacrifice expected product, reduce costs)3.9
Illustrative Product – Market
Structure
Food and beverages
•Generic Product
•Product class
Cereals
Product category
Ready to eat
Regular
Natural
Nutritional
Life
Product 19
Pre-sweetened
Special K
Product type
•Brands
Target Market
?A
market is the set of all actual and potential buyers who
have sufficient want, income for, and access to a product.
? Market segmentation divides the market into distinct
groups of homogeneous consumers who have similar
needs and respond to changes in marketing program
elements
.
3.11
Example of the toothpaste market
Four main segments (Benefits sought):
?
Sensory: Seeking flavor and product appearance
Sociables: Seeking brightness of teeth
Worriers: Seeking decay prevention
Independent: Seeking low price
1.
2.
3.
4.
Behavioral Segmentation – accurate creation of products &
communication
Demographics related to behavior
Demographics segments may not relate to motives
?
?
?
?
Do All affluent boomers drink wine?
3.12
Perceptual Map
3.13
Positioning Bases
3.14
Bandages as Temporary Tattoos
3.15
Freeline Skates
3.16
Attribute and Benefit Trade-offs
?
?
?
?
?
?
?
?
Negatively correlated attributes/benefits (may be within
one attribute: heritage = outdated)
Price and quality
Convenience and quality
Taste and low calories
Efficacy and mildness
Power and safety
Ubiquity and prestige
Comprehensiveness (variety) and simplicity
3.17
Core Brand Values
?
Set of abstract concepts or phrases that characterize the
five to ten most important dimensions of the mental map
of a brand
?
Relate to points-of-parity and points-of-difference
?
Mental map ? Core brand values ? Brand mantra
3.18
•
•
•
•
Brand Mantras
An articulation of the “heart and soul” of the brand
(Corporate, family)
similar to “brand essence” or “core brand promise”
Short three- to five-word phrases that capture the irrefutable
essence or spirit of the brand positioning and brand values
Considerations
–
–
–
Communicate
Simplify
Inspire
Authentic Athletic Performance
3.19
Designing the Brand Mantra
?
?
?
The term brand functions describes the nature of the
product or service; broader business scope
The descriptive modifier clarifies type of function.
The emotional modifier provides another qualifier—how
does the brand provide emotional benefits
3.20
Designing the Brand Mantra
Emotional
Modifier
Descriptive
Modifier
Brand
Functions
Nike
Authentic
Athletic
Performance
Disney
Fun
Family
Entertainment
Fun
Folks
Food
3.21
Brand Inventory
?
A current comprehensive profile of how all the products
and services sold by a company are branded and marketed:
?
?
?
?
?
Brand elements
Supporting marketing programs
Profile of competitive brands
POPs and PODs
Brand mantra
3.22
Brand Inventory (Cont.)
?
?
?
Suggests the bases for positioning the brand
Offers insights to how brand equity may be better managed
Assesses consistency in message among activities, brand
extensions, and sub-brands in order to avoid redundancies,
overlaps, and consumer confusion
3.23
Brand Exploratory
?
Provides detailed information as to how consumers
perceive the brand:
?
?
?
?
?
Awareness
Favorability
Uniqueness of associations
Helps identify sources of customer-based brand equity
Uncovers knowledge structures for the core brand as well
as its competitors
3.24
Suggested Brand Audit Outline
?
?
?
?
?
Brand audit objectives, scope, and approach
Background about the brand (self-analysis)
Background about the industries
Consumer analysis (trends, motivation, perceptions,
needs, segmentation, behavior)
Brand inventory
?
?
?
?
?
Elements, current marketing programs, POPs, PODs
Branding strategies (extensions, sub-brands, etc.)
Brand portfolio analysis
Competitors’ brand inventory
Strengths and weaknesses
3.25
Brand Audit Outline (Cont.)
?
Brand exploratory
?
?
?
?
?
?
?
Brand associations
Brand positioning analysis
Consumer perceptions analysis (vs. competition)
Summary of competitor analysis
SWOT analysis
Brand equity evaluation
Strategic brand management recommendations
3.26

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