Case Study Analysis Report

1
Generic Example of a Case Study Analysis Report
Executive Summary
This document outlines the structure of the case study analysis report and the examples of basic
tables/figures that could be considered for different analyses. The structure of these tables is
simple and easy to produce in WORD. Students are encouraged to search for and use more
advanced frameworks, tables, and/or figures for each analysis. This document also provides
generic guidelines and examples based on information provided in the “Global ice cream wars”
case study.
In the executive summary, students can provide information about the Unilever in the ice cream
market and a brief overview of the challenges discussed in the case study. Brief information
about the industry emerging trends or the company’s vision/mission can be indicated in the
executive summary. Executive summary should be no more than 200 words (not included in
the word count). Please use font size 12 for the main body of the report and font size 10 for the
text in the tables and figures (i.e., similar to this example report). Please do not use small fonts
in the main text and tables/figures.
Table of Contents
Contents Page(s)
Executive Summary 1
Table of Contents 1
Situation Analysis – Analysis of Macro Environment 2
Situation Analysis – Analysis of Industry Competition and Competitors 3
Situation Analysis – Analysis of Customers 5
Internal Environment & SWOT Analysis 6
Evaluation of Current Strategies and Problem Statement 8
Alternative Strategies 9
References (optional) 10
2
Situation Analysis – Analysis of Macro Environment
Students should discuss key macro-environmental factors identified in Table 1 that influence
the industry and the studied company in the case study. The conclusion of this section should
be no more than 100 words. Identified factors can be presented as bullet points. If there is no
information in the case study concerning a macro environment factor (i.e., political), students
can leave the related row in the table blank. For instance, students can discuss the importance
of ice cream global market growth and related opportunities for Unilever.
Table 1. PESTLE Analysis
Macro-Level Factors Importance of key factors to
the market or the company
Political Macro-level information related to the government
actions that may affect the business environment,
such as tax policies, Fiscal policy, and trade tariffs.
XYZ
Economic Macro-level information related to inflation,
employment, income, interest rates, taxes, trade
restrictions, tariffs, business cycle, Willingness to
spend, confidence, and spending patterns.
e.g., Economic growth in many
countries results growing the
global market for ice cream
around 3 per cent annually.
Market growth represent an
opportunity for companies in this
industry.
Socio-cultural Macro-level information related to cultural trends,
demographics, and population analytics.
XYZ
Technological Macro-level information related to innovations in
technology that may affect the operations of the
industry and the market favourably or unfavourably.
XYZ
Legal Macro-level information related to consumer laws,
safety standards, and labour laws. In some cases,
political and legal issues can be grouped in one
category.
XYZ
Environmental Macro-level information related to climate, weather,
geographical location, global changes in climate,
environmental offsets.
XYZ
3
Situation Analysis – Analysis of Industry Competition and Competitors
Students should discuss key micro-environmental factors that affect the industry competitive
intensity and market attractiveness. Students should also identify and assess the competitors in
the market. The conclusion of this section should be no more than 200 words. This section
includes two analyses:
First, the degree of industry competitive intensity and market attractiveness can be
assessed using Porter’s Five Forces framework. This framework assesses the competitive
intensity and, therefore, the attractiveness (or lack of it) of an industry in terms of its
profitability. An “unattractive” industry is one in which the effect of these five forces reduces
overall profitability. For instance, the global ice cream market is highly competitive due to
high intensity of rivalry and bargaining power of customers, but it is attractive for existing
companies -Unilever- given the high barriers for entry, low bargaining power of suppliers,
moderate threat of substitute products, and growing the market size. This market is unattractive
for new and small companies because of the high intensity of rivalry, bargaining power of
customers, and barriers to entry. Students can adopt different templates (i.e., figures, tables) to
present this framework and provide the conclusion of the analysis.
Table 2. Five Forces Analysis
Force Related Factors Assessment
Intensity of
rivalry
§ Number of competitors
§ Sustainable competitive advantage through innovation
§ Competition between online and offline organizations
§ Powerful competitors and level of advertising expense
High,
Moderate, or
Low
Threat of new
entrants
§ Patents & rights
§ Government policy such as sanctioned monopolies
§ Capital requirements
§ Economies of scale
§ Product differentiation
§ Brand equity & customer loyalty
§ Access to distribution channels
High,
Moderate, or
Low
Threat of
substitutes
§ Relative price performance of substitute
§ Buyer switching costs and ease of substitution
§ Perceived level of product differentiation
§ Number of substitute products in the market
§ Availability of close substitute
High,
Moderate, or
Low
Bargaining
power of
customers
§ Degree of dependency upon existing channels of distribution
§ Buyer switching costs
§ Buyer information availability
§ Availability of existing substitute products
§ Buyer price sensitivity
§ Differential advantage (uniqueness) of industry products
High,
Moderate, or
Low
Bargaining
power of
suppliers
§ Supplier switching costs relative to focal company switching costs
§ Degree of differentiation of inputs
§ Impact of inputs on cost and differentiation
§ Presence of substitute inputs
§ Strength of distribution channel
§ Supplier competition
High,
Moderate, or
Low
4
Second, students should identify key competitors, analyse competitors’ current and future
objectives (i.e., investment priorities), analyse competitors’ current strategies (i.e., current
target markets and marketing mix strategies), and competitors’ current resource profile (i.e.,
tangible and intangible assets, competitive advantage). Students can adopt different templates
(i.e., figures, tables) to outline competitors and provide the conclusion of the analysis. For
instance, Tables 3 outlined key competitors indicated in the “Global ice cream wars” case
study. The conclusion of this table should discuss the position of studied company (i.e.,
Unilever) in the market compared to its competitors, identify main current competitors (i.e.,
largest, strongest), and predict emerging competitors or emerging strategies of current
competitors.
Table 3. Competitor Analysis
Competitor Overview
Key success factors
Acquisition
strategy
Heavily
branded
product range
R&D
and
patents
Flexibility to
create new/local
flavours
Distribution
channel
Nestle (incl.
Dreyer and
Haagen Dazs in
USA, and
Scholler/
Mövenpick)
§ Brand competitor
– 15% world
market share
§ Target market:
Super-premium,
premium branded,
and regular.
++ +++ +++ +++ ++
Häagen Dazs –
rest of world
§ XYZ
§ XYZ n/a* + + n/a –
Mars § XYZ
§ XYZ n/a ++ ++ n/a –
Baskin Robbins § XYZ
§ XYZ n/a + + n/a –
Other (i.e.,
Supermarket
brands)
§ XYZ
§ XYZ — — — n/a –
Optional: Comparison with studied
company – Unilever +++ +++ +++ +++ +++
* n/a: No applicable – Not indicated in the case study.
5
Situation Analysis – Analysis of Customers
This section is the conclusion of multiple principles/frameworks introduced in Chapter 4
(customer analysis), Chapters 7, 8, and 9 (Segmentation/Positioning/Selecting Target
Markets). For instance, please review Figure 4.2, Table 7.4, Figure 9.3 across Chapters 4, 7,
and 9 in the core textbook (Holley et al. 2017, 6th Edition) in order to define the segment’s
profile/characteristics. Please bear in mind that students may need to use insights from the
company’s resource portfolio (as part of internal environment analysis) before analysing and
completing Table 9.5 in Chapter 9. The conclusion of this section should be no more than 100
words. In this section, students should:
§ define the customer segmentation criteria (e.g., see Table 4);
§ identify primary target markets, secondary target markets, possibilities, and avoid target
markets; and,
§ evaluate the current studied company’s current segmentation, positioning, and targeting
strategies for identified market segments.
Table 4. Customer segmentation by price and quality
Segments Segment Profile/Characteristics*
(Who? What? Where?)
Segment Preferences
(What? Why? How? When? Where?)
Primary target:
Premium branded
§ Lower-upper and upper-middle
social classes
§ Mainly customers from developed
economies (e.g., US and UK)
§ Relatively customers from
developing economies (e.g., South
Africa, China)
§ Good quality ingredients with individual, wellknown
branded names, such as Mars, Magnum
and Extrême
§ Prices set above regular and economy categories
but not as high as above: high value added
Secondary target
1: Super-premium
§ Upper-upper and lower-upper social
classes
§ Customers from developed
economies (e.g., US and UK)
§ High quality, exotic flavours, e.g. Häagen-Dazs
Mint Chocolate Chip, Ben & Jerry’s Fudge
§ Very high unit prices: very high value added
Secondary target
1: Regular
§ Lower-middle and upper-lower
social classes
§ Customers from developed
economies (e.g., US and UK) and
emerging economies (e.g., South
Africa, China)
§ Standard-quality ingredients with branding
relying on manufacturer’s name rather than
individual product, e.g. Wall’s, Scholler
§ Standard prices: adequate value added but largevolume
market
Possibilities: Ice
cream for cold
weather
§ Upper-upper, lower-upper, and
upper-middle social classes
§ Customers from developed
economies (e.g., US and UK)
§ Good quality ingredients with individual, wellknown
branded names
§ Prices set above regular and economy categories
but not as high as above: high value added
Avoid targets:
Economy
§ Lower-lower social class
§ Mainly customers from developing
economies (e.g., South Africa,
China)
§ Relatively customers from
developed economies (e.g., US and
UK)
§ Manufactured by smaller manufacturers with
standard-quality ingredients, possibly for
supermarkets’ own brands
§ Lower price, highly price competitive: low
value added but large market – perhaps highquality
ingredients
* Based on the information from the “Global ice cream wars” case study, this column is mainly based on logical
assumptions. For instance, only upper-upper and lower-upper social classes afford to purchase super-premium
products with high price tags.
6
Internal Environment & SWOT Analysis
Students should also identify and assess the competitors in the market. This section includes
two analyses: First, identification of the company’s strategic type based on Porter’s generic
strategy types. Second, SWOT analysis. This section should be no more than 350 words.
Identification of the company’s current strategic type helps to better understand its position
in the market (linked to competitor analysis) and its positioning and targeting strategies (linked
customer analysis). It also helps to assess the company’s value propositions and strategic
decisions. For instance, companies with “focused differentiation strategy” are more likely to
heavily invest in R&D and develop premium products. It also plays a critical role in defining
the company’s problems and proposing relevant alternative strategies. For instance, proposing
focused low-cost strategies is not appropriate with for leading brand, such as Porsche and
Apple. It is recommended to suggest minimum two alternative strategies for companies with
hybrid strategy type (i.e., one differentiation strategy and one low-cost strategy – please review
papers on organisational ambidexterity). No table or figure is required for this section.
SWOT analysis is a technique to identify a company’s strengths and weaknesses and its
opportunities and threats in the market. Students can use multiple techniques/frameworks
introduced in Chapters 6 (i.e., resource portfolio) to identify a company’s strengths and
weaknesses. Students also can use the findings in the previous analyses (i.e., PESTLE,
competitive environment, competitor analysis, customer analysis) to identify opportunities and
threats in the market. SWOT analysis is designed for use in the preliminary stages of decisionmaking
and can be used as a tool for evaluation of a company’s current strategies, performance,
and position in the market.
Table 5. SWOT Analysis
Strengths
– Heavily branded product range
– Market share (27% of the world)
– R&D and patents
– Strong Distribution channel
– Acquisition strategy
Weaknesses
– Operations costs
– Weak bargaining power to chain supermarkets as
one of their major business customers
– Lack of synergy with other Unilever’s
brands/products compared to Nestle and Mars
Opportunities
-Economic growth in many countries and
therefore increase purchasing power of
customers
– Potential desire for local flavoured ice-creams
– Emergence of new segmentations
Threats
– Customer choices: Strong competitors
– Merger of competitors
– Lower demand in countries with cold winters
– Emergence of low-cost focused competitors
7
The conclusion of SWOT analysis should answer the following questions:
§ How do these strengths enable the company to meet customers’ needs? How do these
strengths differentiate the company from its competitors?
§ How do these weaknesses prevent the company from meeting customers’ needs? How do
these weaknesses negatively differentiate the company from its competitors?
§ How are these opportunities related to serving customers’ needs? What is the time horizon
of each opportunity?
§ How are these threats related to serving customers’ needs? What is the time horizon of
each threat?
8
Evaluation of Current Strategies and Problem Statement
The identification and definition of the problem(s)/challenge(s) facing the company is the most
critical part of the analysis framework. Only a problem properly defined can be addressed.
Define the problem too narrowly, or miss the key problem, and all subsequent framework steps
will be off the mark. Getting a clear picture of the problem is one major benefit derived from
the situation and internal analyses.
The process of identifying problems is similar to the one people go through with their doctors.
A nurse or assistant comes in to conduct a strength and weakness assessment on a patient. The
patient’s vital signs are taken and the patient is asked about any symptoms he/she may be
experiencing. Symptoms are observable manifestations or indications that a problem may be
present. Symptoms are not the problem themselves. The most important question in the
identification of any problem is Why?. Why questions should always be asked after a potential
problem has been proposed. Student can ask Why questions for key symptoms related to a
company’s strategies and performance.
§ Describe the company’s current marketing strategies. Which elements of the strategy are
working well? Which elements are not? Why?
§ Describe the company’s current performance (sales volume, market share, profitability,
awareness, brand preference) compared to other companies in the industry. Is the
performance of the industry as a whole improving or declining? Why? If the company’s
performance is declining, what is the most likely cause (e.g., environmental changes,
flawed strategy, poor implementation)? Why?
Example from the “Global ice cream wars” case study:
There are indications in the case study that the market share of supermarket brands is growing
(Why?). The underlying reason is that supermarket brands offer similar products (i.e., new
flavours) at a lower price, as they use their existing (but limited) distribution channels and sell
products directly to customers with no cost intermediaries. When you can no longer devise a
meaningful response to the Why question, the problem is probably revealed. In this instance,
the problem is: Unilever faces growing competition from supermarket brands and their
cheaper products, because of they sell products directly to customers using their existing
(but limited) distribution channel.
When the key problem is identified, students should state them concisely and precisely in this
section. This section should be no more than 350 words. Due to the word limitation, it is
recommended that students only identify and define one key problem in the case study (while
there might be multiple key problems). No table or figure is required for this section.
9
Alternative Strategies
Once a problem is defined clearly and succinctly, students are in a position to develop a set of
alternative strategies that have a reasonable potential to solve the identified problem.
Alternative strategies should identify basic directions that a company may undertake to develop
and offer new value propositions to the market, penetrate to new market segments, etc.
Although students can consider novel alternative strategies to address the identified problem,
an alternative strategy could be Status Quo with improvements.
Once a single or a set of alternative strategies are developed, it is time to do evaluate each
alternative. Three major criteria should be used in this evaluation process.
1. First, does the alternative strategy address the identified problem? Is there consistency
between the alternative and the company’s strategic type?
2. The second criterion relates to the feasibility of an alternative strategy: How well does an
alternative strategy match up with the internal and external environments of the company?
3. Students should also make an effort to estimate and evaluate the benefits, costs, and other
implications of pursuing the suggested alternative strategy. For instance, does an
alternative strategy enable a company to explore a market opportunity and increase the
market share? Does it help a company to strengthen brand reputation? Does it help to
minimize an environmental threat and defend the current market share?
To sum up, the proposed alternative strategies should be the best options for a company in
terms of all three criteria: consistency with the strategic type, harmony with the internal and
external environments, and strongest probable financial and other strategic outcomes. A useful
technique to help align strategies and objectives is to present them together in a table, along
with the insight developed from the situation and internal analyses which may have informed
the strategy (see Table 6 – optional for the report). This section should be no more than 350
words. No table or figure is required for this section.
Table 6. Evaluation and Justification of Alternative Strategies
Objectives Alternative Strategy Justifications
A specific objective to
address the identified
problem.
e.g., Distribute icecream
through other
outlets to compete
with supermarket
brands
Provide ice-cream kiosks and
take the exclusive right to serve
ice cream in different cinema
chain companies (i.e., Vue,
Showcase) across the UK.
Although impulse segmentation represents a
secondary target market, the size of the overall
market is growing and other competitors with
limited distribution channel cannot cover multiple
geographical regions. This strategy is also
consistent with the Unilever’s strategic type and it
provides the opportunity to sell premium and
regular branded products in less competitive
outlets. This strategy is feasible for Unilever given
its strong distribution channels and financial
resources to provide kiosks and supply ice-cream.
This strategy might be also attractive for cinema
chain companies given the Unilever ice-creams’
product range and brand reputation.
10
References (Optional – Following references are used for this example report)
– Hooley, G., Piercy, N., and Nicoulaud, B. (2017), Marketing Strategy & Competitive
Positioning, Prentice Hall, 6th Edition.
– Ferrell, O., and Hartline M. D. (2014), Marketing Strategy, Cengage, 6th Edition.
– MAN3106 Module handbook (2020) Surrey Learn.
– MAN3106 Individual assignment handbook (2020) Surrey Learn.
– MAN3106 Lecture/Seminar Slides (2020) Surrey Learn.

Don't use plagiarized sources. Get Your Custom Essay on
Case Study Analysis Report
For $10/Page 0nly
Order Essay
Calculator

Calculate the price of your paper

Total price:$26

Need a better grade?
We've got you covered.

Order your paper